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Date:
01-09-11

Host:
Whitley Strieber

Guests:
Starfire Tor, Joseph P. Farrell

Guest host Whitley Strieber (email) was joined by psi researcher, author, and experiencer, Starfire Tor, who discussed time anomalies as well as her predictions for 2011. Anne Strieber also joined the conversation to discuss a time shift experience that was shared by the Striebers and Tor during a visit to the Magic Castle in Los Angeles.

The trio recounted their experience and explained that, during this particular event, Anne and Tor went to use the ladies’ room at the Magic Castle while Whitley waited outside. Despite the bathroom being empty when they entered it and Whitley outside watching the door, a woman somehow appeared inside the room and exited behind Anne when she left. Recalling the event, an incredulous Anne pondered that "she had not been in there, so how could she have come out of there?" Having investigated the building to make sure that there was no potential for chicanery by the resident magicians, Tor concluded that "the elements of at least two co-existing time lines were edited together." Based on her investigation and documentation of the case as well as the fact that it was experienced by three people, Tor asserted that it is "the most important one that has ever been known to happen."

Tor, who made a number of correct predictions for 2010 such as the plane crash which killed the Polish president as well as the Icelandic volcano eruption, shared some of her precognitive visions for 2011. She predicted that it will be announced that a "new science" has been discovered, which can be used to rebuff incoming objects like meteors or asteroids. According to Tor, this new technology will also be used to restore the ozone layer and cleanse the atmosphere as well. "These are all the strides you can look forward to in 2011," she declared. Additionally, she foresees the status of cetaceans, like whales and dolphins, will change "from animal to non-human person." This change in perspective will constitute an "important step" for humans which will eventually lead to "public ET contact."

Mysterious Animal Deaths

In the first hour, researcher Joseph P. Farrell shared his thoughts on the massive, worldwide wave of bird and fish deaths. He suggested that the events could be caused by either weather manipulation or the testing of electromagnetic technology such as HAARP. Given the variety of species that have been affected, Farrell ruled out biological weapons as a possible cause for the deaths. He also observed that the wave of animal deaths has had a sociological effect, where "it seems to be planting a meme, in the cultural consciousness, of dire apocalyptic things happening."

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Artwork Under the Sea

Artwork Under the Sea

In an effort to draw tourists’ attention away from the endangered reefs of the Caribbean, a Mexico-based artist has created an amazing underwater sculpture garden. Dubbed "The Silent Evolution," the project features a vast array of life-size sculptures created from casts of actual people living in the area. More on the story, including additional photos, here.


Ancient Mysteries & Parallel Dimensions – Shows – Coast to Coast AM

via Ancient Mysteries & Parallel Dimensions – Shows – Coast to Coast AM.

Ancient Mysteries & Parallel Dimensions

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Date: 10-18-10
Host: George Noory
Guests: Graham Hancock, Dr. Philip Stahel

Author and investigator Graham Hancock talked about his research into ancient mysteries, supernatural beings, and parallel realms. He discussed the archaeological discovery of the megalithic site at Gobekli Tepe in Turkey, dating back almost 12,000 years old. On a scale like Stonehenge (though far older), “the site is constructed out of giant stones which have been carved very precisely often with reliefs of animals and strange supernatural figures,” he noted. There is no context for a site like this in archaeological study; “it just seems to come out of nowhere…in a fully formed, incredibly impressive state,” almost like a buried time capsule, he said.

Our world could be interpenetrated by other dimensions or realms that are most often undetectable, Hancock stated, adding that this could account for the UFO phenomenon which seems quite elusive. These other dimensions could also include the spirit world. He cited how cave paintings dating back thousands of years depicted spirit or supernatural beings. During the medieval era people spoke about fairies, elves, and the realms they inhabited, while today alien abduction and UFO craft are reported. What we’re seeing is actually one phenomena “viewed through different cultural spectacles” that originates in a parallel dimension or realm, he explained.

He also talked about his recent novel Entangled, which deals with time travel, NDEs, and the supernatural. Interestingly, in his book he featured neanderthal characters who were compassionate, and now well after he wrote the work, scientific reports have just emerged that suggest neanderthals were indeed nurturing and caring, and not the brutish thugs most people picture.

Botched Surgeries

First half-hour guest, Dr. Philip Stahel talked about the increase in botched surgeries, specifically wrong side (of the body), and wrong patient operations. He noted the importance of following the correct protocol such as writing the word “yes” in permanent marker on the part of the body to be operated on, as well as the patient being proactive about a hospital’s quality assurance process.

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Sir Isaac Newton was a towering genius in the history of science, he knew he was a genius, and he didn’t like wasting his time. Born on Dec. 25, 1642, the great English physicist and mathematician rarely socialized or traveled far from home. He didn’t play sports or a musical instrument, gamble at whist or gambol on a horse. He dismissed poetry as “a kind of ingenious nonsense,” and the one time he attended an opera he fled at the third act. Newton was unmarried, had no known romantic liaisons and may well have died, at the age of 85, with his virginity intact. “I never knew him to take any recreation or pastime,” said his assistant, Humphrey Newton, “thinking all hours lost that were not spent on his studies.”

No, it wasn’t easy being Newton. Not only did he hammer out the universal laws of motion and gravitational attraction, formulating equations that are still used today to plot the trajectories of space rovers bound for Mars; and not only did he discover the spectral properties of light and invent calculus. Sir Isaac had a whole other full-time career, a parallel intellectual passion that he kept largely hidden from view but that rivaled and sometimes surpassed in intensity his devotion to celestial mechanics. Newton was a serious alchemist, who spent night upon dawn for three decades of his life slaving over a stygian furnace in search of the power to transmute one chemical element into another.

Newton’s interest in alchemy has long been known in broad outline, but the scope and details of that moonlighting enterprise are only now becoming clear, as science historians gradually analyze and publish Newton’s extensive writings on alchemy — a million-plus words from the Newtonian archives that had previously been largely ignored.

Speaking last week at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Ontario, William Newman, a professor of the history and philosophy of science at Indiana University in Bloomington, described his studies of Newton’s alchemical oeuvre, and offered insight into the central mystery that often baffles contemporary Newton fans. How could the man who vies in surveys with Albert Einstein for the title of “greatest physicist ever,” the man whom James Gleick has aptly designated “chief architect of the modern world,” have been so swept up in what looks to modern eyes like a medieval delusion? How could the ultimate scientist have been seemingly hornswoggled by a totemic psuedoscience like alchemy, which in its commonest rendering is described as the desire to transform lead into gold? Was Newton mad — perhaps made mad by exposure to mercury, as some have proposed? Was he greedy, or gullible, or stubbornly blind to the truth?

In Dr. Newman’s view, none of the above. Sir Isaac the Alchemist, he said, was no less the fierce and uncompromising scientist than was Sir Isaac, author of the magisterial Principia Mathematica. There were plenty of theoretical and empirical reasons at the time to take the principles of alchemy seriously, to believe that compounds could be broken down into their basic constituents and those constituents then reconfigured into other, more desirable substances.

Miners were pulling up from the ground twisted bundles of copper and silver that were shaped like the stalks of a plant, suggesting that veins of metals and minerals were proliferating underground with almost florid zeal.

Pools found around other mines seemed to have extraordinary properties. Dip an iron bar into the cerulean waters of the vitriol springs of modern-day Slovakia, for example, and the artifact will emerge agleam with copper, as though the dull, dark particles of the original had been elementally reinvented. “It was perfectly reasonable for Isaac Newton to believe in alchemy,” said Dr. Newman. “Most of the experimental scientists of the 17th century did.”

Moreover, while the alchemists of the day may not have mastered the art of transmuting one element into another — an ordeal that we have since learned requires serious equipment like a particle accelerator, or the belly of a star — their work yielded a bounty of valuable spinoffs, including new drugs, brighter paints, stronger soaps and better booze. “Alchemy was synonymous with chemistry,” said Dr. Newman, “and chemistry was much bigger than transmutation.”

For Newton, alchemy may also have proved bigger than chemistry. Dr. Newman argues that Sir Isaac’s alchemical investigations helped yield one of his fundamental breakthroughs in physics: his discovery that white light is a mixture of colored rays, and that a sunbeam prismatically fractured into the familiar rainbow suite called Roy G. Biv can with a lens be resolved to tidy white sunbeam once again. “I would go so far as to say that alchemy was crucial to Newton’s breakthroughs in optics,” said Dr. Newman. “He’s not just passing light through a prism — he’s resynthesizing it.” Consider this a case of “technology transfer,” said Dr. Newman, “from chemistry to physics.”

A version of this article appeared in print on October 12, 2010, on page D1 of the New York edition.

Superstitions Bring Real Luck, Study Reveals | Good Luck Charms Actually Bring Luck, Scientists Find | Life\\’s Little Mysteries

via Superstitions Bring Real Luck, Study Reveals | Good Luck Charms Actually Bring Luck, Scientists Find | Life\\\’s Little Mysteries.

The next time you cross your fingers or tell someone to break a leg, you may actually be bringing some luck.

This is what a team of psychologists at the University of Cologne in Germany report in the May issue of the journal Psychological Science. In a series of experiments employing tasks involving memory and motor skills, the scientists studied the effect of behavior and “object superstitions” – which rely on good luck charms – in college students.Superstitious ways of bringing good luck are found in cultures around the world, and it turns out they may be ubiquitous for a very good reason: To some extent,superstitions work. New research shows that believing in, say, the power of a good luck charm can actually help improve performance in certain situations, even though the charm and event aren’t logically linked.

Cross your fingers

The first experiment looked at the influence of the concept of good luck in a test of putting a golf ball. Experimenters handed participants a ball, and those who were told the ball was lucky tended to outperform those who weren’t.
In another experiment, participants were given a cube containing tiny balls and a slab with holes. The goal was to get as many balls in the holes as quickly as possible. Again, participants who were told, “I’ll cross my fingers for you,” by the experimenter performed better.

The final two experiments involved a lucky charm brought by each participant. In a memory test and an anagram test, the participants who were permitted to keep their lucky charms with them performed better.

Boosted confidence

To find out if superstitious beliefs were truly giving students an edge, the scientists surveyed them before the final two experiments to gauge their confidence levels. The participants who kept their good luck charms set higher goals for what they wanted to achieve on the tasks, and said they felt more confident in their abilities.

“Engaging in superstitious thoughts and behaviors may be one way to reach one’s top level of performance,” the researchers write in the journal article.

People often become superstitious when faced with unknown and stressful situations, possibly explaining why athletes and students are often superstitious, the researchers say. Engaging in a superstition could reduce tension related to a high-stakes competition or an exam.

As the study showed, superstitious beliefs may also increase a person’s belief in his or her own abilities and talents. And what may seem like a “lucky break” when the underdog team wins may really be the result of team-wide, superstition-induced confidence.


Findings – Discovering the Virtues of a Wandering Mind – NYTimes.com.

Discovering the Virtues of a Wandering Mind

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At long last, the doodling daydreamer is getting some respect.

Viktor Koen

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In the past, daydreaming was often considered a failure of mental discipline, or worse. Freud labeled it infantile and neurotic. Psychology textbooks warned it could lead to psychosis. Neuroscientists complained that the rogue bursts of activity on brain scans kept interfering with their studies of more important mental functions.

But now that researchers have been analyzing those stray thoughts, they’ve found daydreaming to be remarkably common — and often quite useful. A wandering mind can protect you from immediate perils and keep you on course toward long-term goals. Sometimes daydreaming is counterproductive, but sometimes it fosters creativity and helps you solve problems.

Consider, for instance, these three words: eye, gown, basket. Can you think of another word that relates to all three? If not, don’t worry for now. By the time we get back to discussing the scientific significance of this puzzle, the answer might occur to you through the “incubation effect” as your mind wanders from the text of this article — and, yes, your mind is probably going to wander, no matter how brilliant the rest of this column is.

Mind wandering, as psychologists define it, is a subcategory of daydreaming, which is the broad term for all stray thoughts and fantasies, including those moments you deliberately set aside to imagine yourself winning the lottery or accepting the Nobel. But when you’re trying to accomplish one thing and lapse into “task-unrelated thoughts,” that’s mind wandering.

During waking hours, people’s minds seem to wander about 30 percent of the time, according to estimates by psychologists who have interrupted people throughout the day to ask what they’re thinking. If you’re driving down a straight, empty highway, your mind might be wandering three-quarters of the time, according to two of the leading researchers, Jonathan Schooler and Jonathan Smallwood of the University of California, Santa Barbara.

“People assume mind wandering is a bad thing, but if we couldn’t do it during a boring task, life would be horrible,” Dr. Smallwood says. “Imagine if you couldn’t escape mentally from a traffic jam.”

You’d be stuck contemplating the mass of idling cars, a mental exercise that is much less pleasant than dreaming about a beach and much less useful than mulling what to do once you get off the road. There’s an evolutionary advantage to the brain’s system of mind wandering, says Eric Klinger, a psychologist at the University of Minnesota and one of the pioneers of the field.

“While a person is occupied with one task, this system keeps the individual’s larger agenda fresher in mind,” Dr. Klinger writes in the “Handbook of Imagination and Mental Simulation. “It thus serves as a kind of reminder mechanism, thereby increasing the likelihood that the other goal pursuits will remain intact and not get lost in the shuffle of pursuing many goals.”

Of course, it’s often hard to know which agenda is most evolutionarily adaptive at any moment. If, during a professor’s lecture, students start checking out peers of the opposite sex sitting nearby, are their brains missing out on vital knowledge or working on the more important agenda of finding a mate? Depends on the lecture.

But mind wandering clearly seems to be a dubious strategy, if, for example, you’re tailgating a driver who suddenly brakes. Or, to cite activities that have actually been studied in the laboratory, when you’re sitting by yourself reading “War and Peace” or “Sense and Sensibility.”

If your mind is elsewhere while your eyes are scanning Tolstoy’s or Austen’s words, you’re wasting your own time. You’d be better off putting down the book and doing something more enjoyable or productive than “mindless reading,” as researchers call it.

Yet when people sit down in a laboratory with nothing on the agenda except to read a novel and report whenever their mind wanders, in the course of a half hour they typically report one to three episodes. And those are just the lapses they themselves notice, thanks to their wandering brains being in a state of “meta-awareness,” as it’s called by Dr. Schooler,

He, and other researchers have also studied the many other occasions when readers aren’t aware of their own wandering minds, a condition known in the psychological literature as “zoning out.” (For once, a good bit of technical jargon.) When experimenters sporadically interrupted people reading to ask if their minds were on the text at that moment, about 10 percent of the time people replied that their thoughts were elsewhere — but they hadn’t been aware of the wandering until being asked about it.

“It’s daunting to think that we’re slipping in and out so frequently and we never notice that we were gone,” Dr. Schooler says. “We have this intuition that the one thing we should know is what’s going on in our minds: I think, therefore I am. It’s the last bastion of what we know, and yet we don’t even know that so well.”

The frequency of zoning out more than doubled in reading experiments involving smokers who craved a cigarette and in people who were given a vodka cocktail before taking on “War and Peace.” Besides increasing the amount of mind wandering, the people made alcohol less likely to notice when their minds wandered from Tolstoy’s text.

In another reading experiment, researchers mangled a series of consecutive sentences by switching the position of two of nouns in each one — the way that “alcohol” and “people” were switched in the last sentence of the previous paragraph. In the laboratory experiment, even though the readers were told to look for sections of gibberish somewhere in the story, only half of them spotted it right away. The rest typically read right through the first mangled sentence and kept going through several more before noticing anything amiss.

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To measure mind wandering more directly, Dr. Schooler and two psychologists at the University of Pittsburgh, Erik D. Reichle and Andrew Reineberg, used a machine that tracked the movements of people’s eyes while reading “Sense and Sensibility” on a computer screen. It’s probably just as well that Jane Austen is not around to see the experiment’s results, which are to appear in a forthcoming issue of Psychological Science.

By comparing the eye movements with the prose on the screen, the experimenters could tell if someone was slowing to understand complex phrases or simply scanning without comprehension. They found that when people’s mind wandered, the episode could last as long as two minutes.

Where exactly does the mind go during those moments? By observing people at rest during brain scans, neuroscientists have identified a “default network” that is active when people’s minds are especially free to wander. When people do take up a task, the brain’s executive network lights up to issue commands, and the default network is often suppressed.

But during some episodes of mind wandering, both networks are firing simultaneously, according to a study led by Kalina Christoff of the University of British Columbia. Why both networks are active is up for debate. One school theorizes that the executive network is working to control the stray thoughts and put the mind back on task.

Another school of psychologists, which includes the Santa Barbara researchers, theorizes that both networks are working on agendas beyond the immediate task. That theory could help explain why studies have found that people prone to mind wandering also score higher on tests of creativity, like the word-association puzzle mentioned earlier. Perhaps, by putting both of the brain networks to work simultaneously, these people are more likely to realize that the word that relates to eye, gown and basket is ball, as in eyeball, ball gown and basketball.

To encourage this creative process, Dr. Schooler says, it may help if you go jogging, take a walk, do some knitting or just sit around doodling, because relatively undemanding tasks seem to free your mind to wander productively. But you also want to be able to catch yourself at the Eureka moment.

“For creativity you need your mind to wander,” Dr. Schooler says, “but you also need to be able to notice that you’re mind wandering and catch the idea when you have it. If Archimedes had come up with a solution in the bathtub but didn’t notice he’d had the idea, what good would it have done him?”


UFOs & the Paranormal – Shows – Coast to Coast AM.

Writer and media personality Lee Speigel discussed his research and interviews in the field of ufology, as well as his efforts to bring the subject of UFOs to the United Nations. His 1975 album (now available as an audio CD) features his conversations with such notables as Major Donald Keyhoe who said the “government and military have been lying to us all these years” about UFOs, and offered to bring pilots forward that had encounters. Betty Hill was also interviewed about her abduction in this project. Interestingly, Speigel noted that at the time of the Betty & Barney Hill abduction, radar picked up an unknown object in their vicinity in New Hampshire.

Speigel was commissioned by the country of Grenada to make a major presentation on UFOs for the United Nations in 1978. One of the materials he looked at in his preparation was a 1968 physics manual for Air Force cadets– the book had a section on UFOs and suggested they were a global phenomena that had been going on for thousands of years. Further, the book suggested we were likely being visited by 3-4 different species of aliens, at various stages of development.

His UN presentation was a closed-door meeting with Sec. Gen. Kurt Waldheim in attendance and such luminaries as Jacques Vallee, Gordon Cooper, and J. Allen Hynek speaking, as well as Maj. Larry Coyne, a helicopter pilot who had a terrifying UFO encounter in 1973. Grenada’s Prime Minister Eric Gairy led a press conference after the presentation that was not well received, and the proposal to further study UFOs was later tabled, Speigel recounted. He also talked about his interest in other paranormal and spiritual subjects such as firewalking and channeling.
Noah’s Ark Update

In the first hour, journalist Joe Kovacs and curator Richard Rives reacted to the possible discovery of the remains of Noah’s Ark. A 15-member team from Hong Kong and Turkey went up Mount Ararat and found a cave which they excavated and uncovered wooden specimens, Kovacs detailed. Rives talked about a previous investigation which found a fossilized boat-shaped object in another mountainous region of Turkey. For more on the new discovery, see Kovacs’ WND report, as well as the article below.

Website(s):
wyattmuseum.com
shockedbythebible.com
Book(s):
Shocked by the Bible
CD(s):
UFOs: The Credibility Factor


UFOs & the Paranormal – Shows – Coast to Coast AM.

Writer and media personality Lee Speigel discussed his research and interviews in the field of ufology, as well as his efforts to bring the subject of UFOs to the United Nations. His 1975 album (now available as an audio CD) features his conversations with such notables as Major Donald Keyhoe who said the “government and military have been lying to us all these years” about UFOs, and offered to bring pilots forward that had encounters. Betty Hill was also interviewed about her abduction in this project. Interestingly, Speigel noted that at the time of the Betty & Barney Hill abduction, radar picked up an unknown object in their vicinity in New Hampshire.

Speigel was commissioned by the country of Grenada to make a major presentation on UFOs for the United Nations in 1978. One of the materials he looked at in his preparation was a 1968 physics manual for Air Force cadets– the book had a section on UFOs and suggested they were a global phenomena that had been going on for thousands of years. Further, the book suggested we were likely being visited by 3-4 different species of aliens, at various stages of development.

His UN presentation was a closed-door meeting with Sec. Gen. Kurt Waldheim in attendance and such luminaries as Jacques Vallee, Gordon Cooper, and J. Allen Hynek speaking, as well as Maj. Larry Coyne, a helicopter pilot who had a terrifying UFO encounter in 1973. Grenada’s Prime Minister Eric Gairy led a press conference after the presentation that was not well received, and the proposal to further study UFOs was later tabled, Speigel recounted. He also talked about his interest in other paranormal and spiritual subjects such as firewalking and channeling.
Noah’s Ark Update

In the first hour, journalist Joe Kovacs and curator Richard Rives reacted to the possible discovery of the remains of Noah’s Ark. A 15-member team from Hong Kong and Turkey went up Mount Ararat and found a cave which they excavated and uncovered wooden specimens, Kovacs detailed. Rives talked about a previous investigation which found a fossilized boat-shaped object in another mountainous region of Turkey. For more on the new discovery, see Kovacs’ WND report, as well as the article below.

Website(s):
wyattmuseum.com
shockedbythebible.com
Book(s):
Shocked by the Bible
CD(s):
UFOs: The Credibility Factor


The concept of a living universe has been shared by many spiritual traditions and now there is scientific evidence for it, he said. He outlined a number of attributes that support the idea of an alive universe:

  • It is unified rather than fragmented.
  • Energy (such as Zero Point) flows through it.
  • It is a dynamic system, regenerated moment by moment.
  • It has sentience.

Living Universe & Humanity’s Future – 04-15-09 Show – Coast to Coast AM with George Noory


 

5 cm. fir tree removed from patient’s lung
Photo: http://www.kp.ru

5 cm. fir tree removed from patient’s lung

13 Apr, 11:35 PM

A five-centimeter fir tree has been found in the lung of a man who complained he had a strong pain in his chest and was coughing blood.

The 28-year-old patient, Artyom Sidorkin, came to a hospital in the city of Izhevsk in Central Russia last week, Komsomolskaya Pravda daily reports.

Doctors x-rayed his chest and found a tumor in one of the lungs. Suspecting cancer, they made a decision to perform biopsy, but when they cut the tissue, they were amazed to see green needles in the cut.

“I blinked three times, and thought I was seeing things. Then I called the assistant to have a look,” says Vladimir Kamashev, doctor at the Udmurtian Cancer Center.

The five-centimeter branch was removed from the patient’s body.

“They told me my coughing blood was not caused by any disease,” Sidorkin says.

“It was the needles poking the capillaries. It really hurt a lot. But I never felt like I had an alien object inside of me.”

It is obvious that a five-centimeter branch is too large to be inhaled or swallowed, doctors say. They suggest that the patient might have inhaled a small bud, which then started to grow inside his body.

Meanwhile, the piece of lung with the little fir tree has been preserved for further study.

5 cm. fir tree removed from patient’s lung / MosNews.com


 

Ghosts in the Machine – with picture slideshow

Ghost or camera trick? What do you think?

Ghost or camera trick? What do you think?

Ghost or camera trick? What do you think?

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Published Date: 27 March 2009

By Alice Wyllie

WHEN psychologist Richard Wiseman launched an online investigation into the photographic evidence for ghosts earlier this month, he never expected such an overwhelming response.

The project – undertaken as part of the Edinburgh International Science Festival and profiled exclusively in The Scotsman on 10 March – invited people to send in ghostly photographs for analysis and, once they were put up online, asked web users to vote as to whether or not they believed they were the real deal.
To date, the site has received 250 photographs and more than 250,000 votes.
While many of the images can be easily discredited, even Wiseman is finding it particularly tricky to disprove one – the spooky face of a woman at a window at Tantallon Castle in East Lothian. The image came out top in the experiment, with nearly 40 per cent of online voters believing that the photograph shows a bona-fide ghost.
"The study has been a huge success," says Wiseman. "The sheer number of people who’ve got involved shows just how much interest there is in ghosts. We’ve been amazed to find that, even when an image obviously just shows the camera flash reflecting against a surface, around 10 per cent of people still believe it’s a ghost."
A high number of the supposedly ghostly images can be given a simple explanation. What look like mysterious lights, mists and orbs can, in reality, be anything from a camera flash reflecting off dust particles to condensed human breath in front of the lens. However, the Tantallon Castle image has even the logical Wiseman stumped. "It’s a tough one," he says. "This experiment has been a big success, not only because we’ve had so many responses, but because we’ve come across this one very curious image that we simply can’t explain."
Here, we take a closer look at the five images that had the highest number of online voters convinced that something spooky was indeed afoot.

Ghosts in the Machine – with picture slideshow – The Scotsman

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